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Tuesday, 28 February 2017 00:00

Choosing the Right Winter Footwear for Bunions

As the winter months are here, you may find yourself switching to winter shoes such as boots. However, it’s important to be mindful that boots are often narrow and can irritate bunions. Bunions are bony protrusions on the side of the feet that develop over time. Narrow shoes such as winter boots can contribute to the progression of this condition, so it’s vital to accommodate your feet with the proper footwear. Opt for wide shoes and look to treatment options such as orthotics, padding, and if the condition is severe, anti-inflammatory medications, injections, or surgery.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why do Bunions Form?

Genetics – susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can cause bunions to form

How are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions

Recently in the UK a receptionist by the name of Nicola Thorpe, who works at a large accounting firm, was sent home for the day for not adhering to the company dress code.  Her infraction: not wearing high heels to work.  The dress code stipulates that women must “wear heels from 2 to 4 inches high.”  Thorpe was not happy about this, so she started a petition.  Over 154,000 signatures later, the Government Equalities Office and the Parliament have begun the process of addressing their constituents concerns.  On March 6th the Parliament will debate the issue.  There are many studies that have been done that show how wearing high heels can be detrimental to foot and ankle health.  Nerve, ligament, and tendon damage could all result from prolonged wear.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which parts of my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 15 February 2017 00:00

Sever’s Disease: More Common Than You Think

Sever’s disease, medically known as calcaneal apophysitis, is a fairly common ankle condition that affects growing children.  When the heel bone grows faster than the surrounding ligaments, tendons, and muscles, which is the case for most people in their youth, the potential for strain in that area exists.  If the child is especially active, this can lead to swelling and strain on the overstretched tendons.  Sever’s disease won’t typically cause any long-term foot damage.  The best remedy is to simply take it easy.  If your child is exhibiting signs of heel pain, make sure to have him/her rest.  If the symptoms persist, consult with a podiatrist to make sure there aren’t any other problems.

Severs disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is contending with foot or ankle pain, see podiatrist one of our podiatrists, Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain asscoiatied with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Tuesday, 07 February 2017 00:00

Combating Poor Circulation in the Feet

If you experience swelling in the feet, it is most likely due to a buildup of fluid. This condition can occur when your body has poor circulation. When blood flow is disrupted and unable to travel to regions with the smallest blood vessels, like the feet, the lower half of the body is gradually starved of nutrients and oxygen. Poor circulation in the feet happens most often when we sit down for too long and forego any form of activity, leading to our leg muscles being unable to contract and pump blood to our feet. To combat poor circulation in the feet, it is recommended to not sit for longer than 45 minutes without moving around and to do some exercises for your legs.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness  or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD, and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
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