Bensalem (215) 639-4500
Philadelphia (215) 291-0800
Hamilton, NJ (609) 586-6700
 

Blog

Monday, 24 April 2017 00:00

Stretching Key in Avoiding Injuries

During the winter season at the beginning of the year, many people strive to get into shape for the upcoming summer season. Before jumping straight into working out however, many podiatrists agree that it is important to warm up and stretch properly. Injuries such as stress fractures, tendonitis, and plantar fasciitis are all more likely to occur if the feet are not stretched properly. In addition to stretching and warming up, wearing supportive sneakers and slowly increasing high impact activities can also minimize your risk of suffering these injuries.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with one of our podiatrists  from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Being the backbone of the body, the feet carry your entire weight and can easily become overexerted, causing cramps and pain. As with any body part, stretching your feet can serve many benefits. From increasing flexibility to even providing some pain relief, be sure to give your feet a stretch from time to time. This is especially important for athletes or anyone performing aerobic exercises, but anyone experiencing foot pain or is on their feet constantly should also engage in this practice.

Great ways to stretch your feet:

  • Crossing one leg over the others and carefully pull your toes back. Do 10-20 repetitions and repeat the process for each foot
  • Face a wall with your arms out and hands flat against the wall. Step back with one foot and keep it flat on the floor while moving the other leg forward. Lean towards the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and perform 10 repetitions for each foot
  • Be sure not to overextend or push your limbs too hard or you could risk pulling or straining your muscle

Individuals who tend to their feet by regular stretching every day should be able to minimize foot pain and prevent new problems from arising.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stretching Your Feet
Tuesday, 18 April 2017 00:00

What Are Plantar Warts?

There are over 100 different varieties of HPV, or human papilloma virus.  Nearly 12% of the global population have had warts at one time, and plantar warts are but one of these types.  They all share one basic characteristic, they have the ability to infect skin cells.  Many people, when they hear the term HPV, think that it refers to genital warts.  But this is not the case, and HPV can manifest itself in many different forms.  Plantar warts occur on the feet, typically on the palms or the soles.  They can be flat or raised, and usually occur in dry, cracked areas of the foot.  Treatments vary in scope and effectiveness.  If you think you may have a plantar wart, talk to your podiatrist and go through the treatment options available.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Legions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about All About Plantar Warts
Monday, 10 April 2017 00:00

Dealing with Aches and Pains as We Age

Arthritis and aching joints are one of the most prevalent complaints of people 55 years and over. Dr. Kendra Zuckerman of Main Line Health states, “arthritis technically means an inflammation of the joints.” Deborah Wolf, 76, shares her time between practicing law and playing tennis, and is not ready to slow down her rigorous schedule. However, after the development of arthritis in her knees, activity has become difficult. Dr. Zuckerman advises that exercise and weight-watching is important for arthritic patients, and that anti-inflammatory drugs can also help with the pain, too. Deborah works on knee strengthening and diet-planning to keep her pain at bay.

Proper foot care is something many older adults forget to consider. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

The Elderly and their Feet

As we age we start to notice many changes in our body, but the elder population may not notice them right away. Medical conditions may prevent the elderly to take notice of their foot health right away. Poor vision is a lead contributor to not taking action for the elderly.

Common Conditions 

  • Neuropathy – can reduce feeling in the feet, and can hide many life threating medical conditions.
  • Reduced flexibility – prevents the ability of proper toenail trimming, and foot cleaning. If left untreated, it may lead to further medical issues.
  • Foot sores – amongst the older population can be serious before they are discovered. Some of the problematic conditions they may face are:
  • Gouging toenails affecting nearby toe
  • Shoes that don’t fit properly
  • Pressure sores
  • Loss of circulation in legs & feet
  • Edema & swelling of feet and ankles

Susceptible Infections

Diabetes and poor circulation can cause general loss of sensitivity over the years, turning a simple cut into a serious issue.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Elderly and their Feet
Tuesday, 04 April 2017 00:00

Biomechanical abnormalities of the foot

Foot conditions such as flat feet and loose joints are also seen as biomechanical abnormalities of the foot. These abnormalities can also be seen as risk factors for certain foot conditions such as hallux valgus. For long term treatment of these conditions, correction of these abnormalities is required. Several options include wearing appropriate footwear, foot orthotics, toe spacers and bunion cushions. Maintaining proper mobility of the lower-limb joints will make way for stable lower-limb biomechanics as well.

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics
-  Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
-  In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Biomechanics in Podiatry
Connect with us