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Monday, 18 February 2019 00:00

High Heels and Morton’s Neuroma

High heels have become a normal part of many women's lives. Unfortunately, wearing high heels too often can lead to health complications. One of these health complications is Morton’s neuroma, which is a complication involving swelling along a nerve in the foot. This swelling results in burning pain, numbness, and tingling. This affliction is more common in women than men, which might be because it is more common for women to wear high heels. High heels put the foot in an unnatural position and push toes together. Wearing high heels often, can lead to subtle bone shifts that increase the risk for a neuroma to form. Usually, the discomfort caused by this condition can be briefly relieved by taking off your shoes and moving your feet around. Continuing to wear high heels for extended periods of time will aggravate your foot and cause the symptoms to come back. If you feel that you may have a Morton’s neuroma, then it is suggested you speak with a podiatrist about proper treatment methods.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Monday, 11 February 2019 00:00

How to Combat Foot Odor

Sweaty feet are common and can unfortunately result in unpleasant odors. Those with hyperhidrosis of the feet, are especially prone to this inconvenience. Thankfully, there are ways to help eliminate or reduce foot odor caused by excessive sweat. Changing your socks mid-day and applying antifungal powder can help prevent dampness and fungus growth. The antifungal powder absorbs moisture and helps to keep fresh socks dry and clean. Washing your feet daily is also essential, even if you don’t shower every day. Cleaning your feet with antibacterial soap once a day, and applying antifungal powder helps to keep your feet dry and odor free. Applying essential oils such as tea tree and eucalyptus will also help eliminate odors, while adding a new pleasant smell to your feet. These essential oils have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiseptic properties, which makes them perfect for battling sweaty feet. If you have hyperhidrosis or feel that your feet sweat excessively, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist to learn more about treatment options.

If you are suffering from hyperhidrosis contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Hyperhidrosis of the Feet

Hyperhidrosis is a rare disorder that can cause people to have excessive sweating of their feet. This can usually occur all on its own without rigorous activity involved. People who suffer from hyperhidrosis may also experience sweaty palms.

Although it is said that sweating is a healthy process meant to cool down the body temperature and to maintain a proper internal temperature, hyperhidrosis may prove to be a huge hindrance on a person’s everyday life.

Plantar hyperhidrosis is considered to be the main form of hyperhidrosis. Secondary hyperhidrosis can refer to sweating that occurs in areas other than the feet or hands and armpits. Often this may be a sign of it being related to another medical condition such as menopause, hyperthyroidism and even Parkinson’s disease.

In order to alleviate this condition, it is important to see your doctor so that they may prescribe the necessary medications so that you can begin to live a normal life again. If this is left untreated, it is said that it will persist throughout an individual’s life.

A last resort approach would be surgery, but it is best to speak with your doctor to find out what may be the best treatment for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 04 February 2019 00:00

Treating Cuboid Syndrome

Cuboid syndrome is caused by the cuboid bone shifting out of alignment with surrounding bones, which then may cause pain in the middle of the foot. There are various forms of treatment for cuboid syndrome, including home remedies and help from a medical professional. The first step in treating this condition involves rest, because reducing activity that puts pressure on the injured area might give the bone space to heal. Home remedies involve, resting, icing, compressing and elevating the foot. If the pain perseveres, then it may be time to seek help from a medical professional. Two examples of possible treatments are the cuboid whip and the cuboid squeeze. Both options involve manipulating the cuboid bone back into place. Manipulation should be more successful when it is done within 24 hours after the injury occurs, so seeking professional help is important. Foot manipulation may not be the best option if an individual is dealing with other foot conditions, so if you feel that you may have cuboid syndrome or have similar pain, then it is recommended to speak to a podiatrist to find the right treatment for your specific needs.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
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